Late Night Eating Does Not Equal Weight Gain

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Question: I read last week that eating late will not make you any fatter than not eating late at night. I have a habit of eating about 30 minutes before going to bed. Call it a weakness but I can’t seem to lose weight. What the research says and what happens with me don’t seem to line up. What do I need to do to drop some weight because I don’t gain but I don’t lose?
Answer: The research reported that eating late night snacks does not cause weight gain by itself. What researchers found was that eating more calories than the study subjects could utilize and burn off throughout the day caused individuals to gain weight. The time of day that the foods were eaten didn’t make a difference. It adds up like this; too many calories in, not enough calories out you add fat to your frame. Most of us eat more than enough during the day and late night is a hard time not to eat. We all like to watch television and munch. We’re getting sleepy and bored. Commercial after commercial displays mouthwatering foods and we respond by getting a hunger signal. Then we grab something quick to satisfy our appetites. Quick and easy foods are usually high calorie and high carbohydrate.
Since you’re not losing weight, you need to adjust your total daily calories to decrease the amount of food you have prior to your late-night binges or increase your work load to burn more calories in your workouts. Increasing your intensity level while you train can spark your metabolism as well. If you just can’t stay out of the refrigerator then you should make some better choices for your snacks with the intent to keep them under 150 calories and 15 to 20 grams of carbs. Yogurt can be an excellent choice just read the labels and find one that fits the criteria. A tablespoon of peanut butter is only 90 calories and if you spread it on a celery stalk or a slice of whole wheat bread you have a snack that fits the bill. Just avoid having a “Jethro Bodine” size bowl of cereal.
In your training, kick up your intensity by moving at a quicker pace on your cardio or raising the incline on your treadmill a few percent. On one of your cardio days add intense intervals by alternating s strong run with a moderately paved uphill walk. If you really want to add intensity then sprint uphill at the maximum incline for 20 to 30 seconds walk for a minute and return to sprinting again. Push that pace for 3 to 5 minutes, After that, go to an active recovery period for three minutes by doing ab exercises once your heartrate drops back to under 120. Repeat the cycle three to four times. The higher intensity elevates your base metabolic rate slightly for a period of approximately 2 to 6 hours after you finish. A cycle like that is not for beginners but for individuals who are well conditioned and are looking to challenge themselves.
God bless, Merry Christmas and keep training,
Daryl

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