Keeping Hydrated when Training in Hot Conditions

Share

Question: In light of the recent and continuing heat wave, what is the best way for my son to thrive and survive in the heat with practices now and in August?
Answer: The schools, coaches and trainers of the area teams will have to take the unusual heat into consideration for their workout planning by scheduling practices earlier in the morning and later in the evening.
However, that still won’t be enough if the athlete does not take the time to hydrate. If an athlete begins to be thirsty then they are waiting too long to hydrate. Some of the signs of heat exhaustion and dehydration are little or no urine output, little or no sweating, headache, nausea and fainting. If you get to that point you will probably need IV fluids.
The safest way to avoid dehydration is to drink at least a gallon of water the day prior to the practice. What you do the day prior to practice is the most important method to avoiding dehydration. Drink water and a light combination of one of the electrolyte replacement drinks the morning prior to practice, during practice and after practice. Avoid sugary drinks and diet drinks. Also don’t use energy drinks. These can place an usually heavy load on your body when coping with heat.
A level of 3% dehydration can result in a 10% decrease in athletic performance.
Use other external ways to keep cool as well, like towels soaked in ice water to place around your neck or across your legs. Taking off your shoes and socks and cooling your feet is another good way to beat the heat. Avoid extended periods in direct sunlight and seek shade as often as possible.
Water is most important, so drink it in large quantities to offset the huge fluid loss from sweating. Stay cool and if you begin to feel light-headed or unusual quickly inform your coaches and trainers.
God bless and keep training,
Daryl

Share