Self Image and Weight Loss

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Question: I lost over 80 pounds during the last year and a half. Unfortunately, over the last 4 months I’ve gained back about 15 due to excessive work hours which interfered with my training and now I have to begin again to lose weight. My problem is every time I look in the mirror, I see the person who was 80 pounds heavier not someone who needs to just tighten up a bit. How do I get past that image and get myself back on track?
Answer: Getting the weight off once you find your groove can be pretty easy. Finding a balance in your life to keep it off can sometimes be more difficult. The greater issue for you to deal with is the body dismorphia you have been experiencing. What you see at that first moment when you look in the mirror is what you were 80 pounds ago. You blink your eyes and you finally see the real you but that seed of fear is implanted again in your mind. Your first step in changing this is to actually stop looking in the mirror. You have to get ready to face the day, yes, but you don’t need to evaluate yourself every time you go past a large window on the street. Little by little you need to wean yourself off of the need to make sure you still look good. You worry so much about gaining back weight and how you look minute by minute you will never enjoy what you have accomplished. It will take time but be conscious of how often you are looking to find a fault and walk away.
Once you get back on track with your training you will stop worrying as much. Return to your notes about your training in the beginning. Start over but move on a fast track. You won’t need months to get back to where you were or better than you were. It will take only a few weeks of real training again. By doing all that you know to do and all that know you can do, you’ll be less inclined to be so critical of yourself. That assurance provides comfort and you’ll eventually stop feeling the need to look in the mirror to reassure yourself. This need only occurred because you were not able to keep training as you know you shouldhve been.
This time when you drop a bit more weight, since you’ve been at this transition point, you’ll be better equipped to make the change to maintenance training. You’ll need to cut back the frequency of your training but not the intensity. Changes also can be made with your food selections. You may add one additional “cheat” meal on the weekends or increase your total daily calories as much as 200 and 300 calories. Enjoy life because it’s much too short to feel limited by how you think you look. Doing what you know to do will produce the results you want.
God bless and keep training,
Daryl

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