Should You Bypass the Gastric Bypass?

Share

Question: I am considering gastric bypass or lap band surgery because I have reached a point that I need to lose weight or consider serious health repercussions from it. I have tried diets and exercise in the past and nothing has worked. What do you know or think about these surgeries?
Answer: Through the years we have trained several post-sugery clients who now because of the procedure have severely restricted the amount and types of foods they can safely eat. Their doctors all prescribed exercise for them to stimulate their metabolism and increase their muscle mass. This should all sound familiar because it’s the same advice you hear prior to having the surgery. You are aware that any of the gastric or lap type surgeries reduce the size of your stomach allowing you only minuscule amounts of food at a time so you are forced to eat small frequent meals. Sounds familiar also. You are not supposed to eat junk food or high sugar/low fiber foods. However, you are required to eat healthy, high protein foods and for most patients you will include protein drinks in your diet. The things you are required to do to make the surgery most beneficial and maintain your health we preach constantly before you have the surgery. I am sure your doctor has informed you of the risks involved and the lifestyle changes that are necessary for the remainder of your life. Let that sink in: for the rest of your life. Finally, the surgery does not address the issues that drove you to over eating in the first place. It does not eliminate the cravings or how to have a healthy relationship with food; food is fuel. It is good tasting fuel but don’t let your taste buds rule your life.
Exercise is necessary for several reasons. It maintains muscle mass for regulating your metabolism. It strengthens your heart and lungs. Increased blood flow from exercise helps to keep your vascular system flowing well. It helps maintain a healthy blood sugar balance. Exercise increases the flow of fluids in the lymphatic system which helps fight disease and infections. It helps to balance hormone levels and deal with stress. It keeps your joints mobile and moving and maintains flexibility. It is one thing that will keep you young or at least feeling young.
Consider this, if your previous exercise regimen has not been successful was it challenging enough or did you quit when it got tough? Here is one small portion as an example of a tough routine. I have several friends who were Special Forces or Navy SEALS. During training to become part of one of these elite forces that protect our nation, they ran, they ran everywhere. Chow hall was 1 mile from the barracks. They had to run to eat and run back to the barracks. If they were actually eating three times a day they ran 6 miles just to be able to eat. You don’t have to go to that extreme but you do need to train with a purpose and challenge yourself in all the you do. Surgery or not, you are going to have make changes in what you eat and how you eat and change your exercise habits to make yourself healthier. It would seem the wise decision would be to make the changes instead of the procedure.
God bless and keep training,
Daryl

Share