Prevent Your Training From Becoming Stale with Variety!

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Question: I seem to have hit a training plateau. I can’t get past the weights that I have been using for the past month. How can I overcome this wall?
Answer: Most people have no trouble making progress when they start training because it’s all new for them both from a physical standpoint and it’s mentally challenging. Increasing weights on various core lifts is a good way to gauge progress and maintain a progressive program. Because your body is changing, you feel slightly sore and the weights you use regularly increase, and you can see physical differences in your body.Still, it’s easy to fall into a training rut. Changing routines feels like a “catch-22.” You may worry that if you change your training routine you’ll not be able to get those big lifts, but if you don’t change you still won’t be able to increase your big lifts.
It should be a no-brainer. If what you’re doing isn’t providing the results you want you have to change.
What not to change is the real question. If you’re doing 10 to 12 reps per set change the reps. This means you increase the weight and do sets of 6 to 8 reps per set. The opposite applies as well. If you train in low reps ranges, decrease the weight and increase the contraction rep speed slightly while maintaining good form and lowering the bar slowly. Add reps to your training by using 12 to 15 reps per set. You’ll feel a new burn in the muscles. Rep speed is another method to vary your workout and get results. Decrease the weight by 10% and decrease the rep speed doing a slow contraction and slow negative return. This burns deeply in the muscles very quickly and can help in breaking through.
If you do straight sets, meaning you perform one exercise for several sets before moving to a new exercise, switch to supersets. You can do these with opposing muscle groups or as isolation/compound combinations. An example of opposing muscle groups would be to train a chest exercise followed by a back exercise like bench presses and low pulley rows. An example of isolation/compound would be to do dumbbell flyes followed by bench presses to blast chest.
The only way to continue to make changes in the weights you handle and the way you look is to continually challenge yourself with different training techniques and routines. Prevent your training from becoming stale with variety. Switch things up and be creative.
God bless and keep training,
Daryl

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